French Broad Food Co+Op

Hours: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
90 Biltmore Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801
(828)255-7650 | Contact

Order Your Turkey By 11/17
Everyone Welcome
Owners get 5% off on the 5th
Submit Your Truckload Sale Order by 11/9

Hours: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
90 Biltmore Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801
(828)255-7650 | Contact

Hours: 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
90 Biltmore Avenue
Asheville, NC 28801
(828)255-7650 | Contact

Order Your Turkey By 11/17
Everyone Welcome
Owners get 5% off on the 5th

Great Immune Booster Recipes For You To Enjoy!

Anti-infection Tincture

2 parts Echinacea root tincture

2 parts Echinacea leaf and flower tincture

1 part ginger root tincture

1/2 part usnea tincture

1/2 part licorice root tincture

1 part Oregon grape root tincture

You can tincture this all together or separately. Excellent for hard to shake infections of all kinds and tasty!

Shared by the late and beloved Cascade Anderson Geller

Elderberry Wellness Syrup

1 cup elderberries (fresh or dried)

1/2 cup Echinacea root

2 Tbsp. Ginger root dried or 2-3 inch slice fresh

4 cups water

2 cups raw local honey

Place herbs in water and decoct for 30 minutes-1 hour, until reduced by half. Strain and add to the 2 cups elder tea, 2 cups of honey. Mix together well and add a splash of brandy if desired. Store in the fridge.

Fire Cider Zest

Illegal Medicine

1 good sized ginseng root

1/4 cup fresh grated ginger root

Cayenne to taste

Honey

apple cider vinegar

1/8 cup fresh garlic, minced

1/4 cup fresh grated horseradish root

*also consider: mushrooms, fresh turmeric root, hibiscus, orange slices, peppercorns, Echinacea, etc.

Place all herbs in a glass jar and pour in enough vinegar to completely cover. Let sit for 4 weeks. Strain and sweeten with honey to taste. Take a teaspoon daily or add to soups, salads, etc.

Flu Buster Tea

An old gypsy formula

1 part peppermint leaf

1 part elderflowers

1 part yarrow

Blend together and add 1 tsp. per cup of hot water. Infuse and enjoy!

Truckload Sale – November 2019

Return orders by November 9th

Order pick-up November 16th 10-4PM

How it Works:

Step One

Pick up an order form at the Co+op or download one here.

Step Two

Fill out the order form and be sure to include your NAME, TELEPHONE, EMAIL & OWNERSHIP.

  • By placing your email on this sheet, you agree to receive mail from the Co+op about the TruckLoad Sale & other special promotions.

Step Three

Return completed order form by 9 PM on November 9th to the cash registers at the Co+op, or scan and email to orders@frenchbroadfood.coop.  Subject line should read: “TRUCKLOAD SALE 11/16 – LAST NAME”

Step Four

Come pick up & pay for your order in the Co+op Warehouse on November 16 from 10 am to 4 pm. We accept cash, local checks & all major credit cards.

* Please note All sales final. No returns will be accepted. No other discounts will apply to any Truckload Sale items.

Winter Squash Guide

By: Co+op, stronger together

With a dozen common varieties readily available, choosing a winter squash to prepare can be confounding for the home cook. We’ve compiled descriptions of common varieties as well as some handy tips for selecting the right squash for you and plenty of delicious squash recipes you’ll love.

General selection tips

Winter squash are harvested late summer through fall, then “cured” or “hardened off” in open air to toughen their exterior. This process ensures the squash will keep for months without refrigeration. Squash that has been hurried through this step and improperly cured will appear shiny and may be tender enough to be pierced by your fingernail. When selecting any variety of winter squash, the stem is the best indication of ripeness. Stems should be tan, dry, and on some varieties, look fibrous and frayed, or corky. Fresh green stems and those leaking sap signal that the squash was harvested before it was ready. Ripe squash should have vivid, saturated (deep) color and a matte, rather than glossy, finish.

Acorn

This forest green, deeply ribbed squash resembles its namesake, the acorn. It has yellow-orange flesh and a tender-firm texture that holds up when cooked. Acorn’s mild flavor is versatile, making it a traditional choice for stuffing and baking. The hard rind is not good for eating, but helps the squash hold its shape when baked.

  • Selection: Acorn squash should be uniformly green and matte—streaks/spots of orange are fine, but too much orange indicates over ripeness and the squash will be dry and stringy.
  • Best uses: baking, stuffing, mashing.
  • Other varieties: all-white “Cream of the Crop,” and all-yellow “Golden Acorn.”

Blue Hubbard

Good for feeding a crowd, these huge, bumpy textured squash look a bit like a giant gray lemon, tapered at both ends and round in the middle. A common heirloom variety, Blue Hubbard has an unusual, brittle blue-gray outer shell, a green rind, and bright orange flesh. Unlike many other winter squashes, they are only mildly sweet, but have a buttery, nutty flavor and a flaky, dry texture similar to a baked potato.

  • Selection: Choose a squash based on size—1 pound equals approximately 2 cups of chopped squash (tip: if you don’t have use for the entire squash, some produce departments will chop these into smaller pieces for you).
  • Best Uses: baked or mashed, topped with butter, sea salt, and freshly ground black pepper.
  • Other varieties: Golden or Green Hubbard, Baby Blue Hubbard.

Butternut

These squash are named for their peanut-like shape and smooth, beige coloring. Butternut is a good choice for recipes calling for a large amount of squash because they are dense—the seed cavity is in the small bulb opposite the stem end, so the large stem is solid squash. Their vivid orange flesh is sweet and slightly nutty with a smooth texture that falls apart as it cooks. Although the rind is edible, butternut is usually peeled before use.

  • Selection: Choose the amount of squash needed by weight. One pound of butternut equals approximately 2 cups of peeled, chopped squash.
  • Best uses: soups, purees, pies, recipes where smooth texture and sweetness will be highlighted.

Delicata

This oblong squash is butter yellow in color with green mottled striping in shallow ridges. Delicata has a thin, edible skin that is easy to work with but makes it a poor squash for long-term storage; this is why you’ll only find them in the fall. The rich, sweet yellow flesh is flavorful and tastes like chestnuts, corn, and sweet potatoes.

  • Selection: Because they are more susceptible to breakdown than other winter squash, take care to select squash without scratches or blemishes, or they may spoil quickly.
  • Best Uses: Delicata’s walls are thin, making it a quick-cooking squash. It can be sliced in 1/4-inch rings and sautéed until soft and caramelized (remove seeds first), halved and baked in 30 minutes, or broiled with olive oil or butter until caramelized.
  • Other varieties: Sugar Loaf and Honey Boat are varieties of Delicata that have been crossed with Butternut. They are often extremely sweet with notes of caramel, hazelnut, and brown sugar (They’re delicious and fleeting, so we recommend buying them when you find them!).

Heart of Gold/Festival/Carnival

These colorful, festive varieties of squash are all hybrids resulting from a cross between Sweet Dumpling and Acorn, and are somewhere between the two in size. Yellow or cream with green and orange mottling, these three can be difficult to tell apart, but for culinary purposes, they are essentially interchangeable. With a sweet nutty flavor like Dumpling, and a tender-firm texture like Acorn, they are the best of both parent varieties.

  • Selection: Choose brightly colored squash that are heavy for their size.
  • Best uses: baking, stuffing, broiling with brown sugar.

Kabocha (Green or Red)

Kabocha can be dark green with mottled blue-gray striping, or a deep red-orange color that resembles Red Kuri. You can tell the difference between red Kabocha and Red Kuri by their shape: Kabocha is round but flattened at stem end, instead of pointed. The flesh is smooth, dense, and intensely yellow. They are similar in sweetness and texture to a sweet potato.

  • Selection: Choose heavy, blemish free squash. They may have a golden or creamy patch where they rested on the ground.
  • Best Uses: curries, soups, stir-fry, salads.
  • Other varieties: Buttercup, Turban, Turk’s Turban.

Pie Pumpkin

Pie pumpkins differ from larger carving pumpkins in that they have been bred for sweetness and not for size. They are uniformly orange and round with an inedible rind, and are sold alongside other varieties of winter squash (unlike carving pumpkins which are usually displayed separately from winter squash). These squash are mildly sweet and have a rich pumpkin flavor that is perfect for pies and baked goods. They make a beautiful centerpiece when hollowed out and filled with pumpkin soup.

  • Selection: Choose a pie pumpkin that has no hint of green and still has a stem attached; older pumpkins may lose their stems.
  • Best uses: pies, custards, baked goods, curries and stews.

Red Kuri

These vivid orange, beta carotene-saturated squash are shaped like an onion, or teardrop. They have a delicious chestnut-like flavor, and are mildly sweet with a dense texture that holds shape when steamed or cubed, but smooth and velvety when pureed, making them quite versatile.

  • Selection: Select a smooth, uniformly colored squash with no hint of green.
  • Best Uses: Thai curries, soups, pilafs and gratins, baked goods.
  • Other varieties: Hokkaido, Japanese Uchiki.

Spaghetti

These football-sized, bright yellow squash are very different from other varieties in this family. Spaghetti squash has a pale golden interior, and is stringy and dense—in a good way! After sliced in half and baked, use a fork to pry up the strands of flesh and you will see it resembles and has the texture of perfectly cooked spaghetti noodles. These squash are not particularly sweet but have a mild flavor that takes to a wide variety of preparations.

  • Selection: choose a bright yellow squash that is free of blemishes and soft spots.
  • Best uses: baked and separated, then mixed with pesto, tomato sauce, or your favorite pasta topping.

Sweet Dumpling

These small, four- to-six-inch round squash are cream-colored with green mottled streaks and deep ribs similar to Acorn. Pale gold on the inside, with a dry, starchy flesh similar to a potato, these squash are renowned for their rich, honey-sweet flavor.

  • Selection: pick a smooth, blemish-free squash that is heavy for its size and is evenly colored. Avoid a squash that has a pale green tint as it is underripe.
  • Best uses: baking with butter and cinnamon.

Miscellaneous Varieties

At some food co-ops, farmer’s markets, and apple orchards in the fall you may encounter unusual heirloom varieties of squash that are worth trying. If you like butternut, look for Galeux D’eysines, a rich, sweet and velvety French heirloom that is large, pale pink, and covered in brown fibrous warts. You might also like to try Long Island Cheese squash, a flat, round ribbed, beige squash that resembles a large wheel of artisan cheese. If you prefer the firmer, milder Acorn, you might like to try long Banana or Pink Banana squash. If you like a moist,dense textured squash (yam-like), try a Queensland Blue or Jarrahdale pumpkin. These huge varieties are from Australia and New Zealand, respectively, and have stunning brittle blue-green rinds and deep orange flesh. Both are good for mashing and roasting.

Interested in exploring how much there is to love about winter squash? Check out our collection of Sweet and Savory Winter Squash recipes and articles.

Fire Cider is Free of Copyright Restrictions

The future of ‘fire cider’ is decided and the term is now legally determined to be free for all to use.

 

FIRE. CIDER. IS. GENERIC. 
The “Fire Cider 3”, Kathi Langelier of Herbal Revolution, (ME)  Mary Blue of Farmacy Herbs (RI) and Nicole Telkes of Wildflower School of Botanical Medicine, (TX) have had their day in court!!  The trial lasted 9 days and was a huge effort by many involved!! Judge Mastroianni of Springfield, MA federal court has determined in a 40-page decision that fire cider is a generic term!!
Their trial started during the Spring Equinox with the moon in Libra and we ended with the Fall Equinox with the Sun in Libra… LIBRA is JUSTICE!!!

Read more here: We Won! Fire Cider is Generic

Mother Earth Food and French Broad Food Co-Op Partner Together To Deliver Local Food and Goods

Mother Earth Food and French Broad Food Co-Op Partner Together To Deliver Local Food and Goods

Groceries from the Co-op Along with Local and Organic Produce from Regional Farmers  Now Delivered to Homes 

Mother Earth Food & French Broad Food Co-op Logos
For more information: Gretchen Howard Iron Skillet Media 828-231-3594 gretchen@ironskilletmedia.com

ASHEVILLE, NC (September 24, 2019) – Mother Earth Food and French Broad Food Co-Op announce a new partnership that brings local foods and products the Asheville community knows and loves directly to front doorsteps. Mother Earth Food sources the healthiest options from over 50 regional farms and local food artisans for weekly deliveries in the Asheville area – like a farmer’s market on wheels – and now offers over 175 of French Broad Food Co-Op’s products for delivery, with more choices available in the near future.

“With so many options for sourcing groceries and fresh produce, our goal is to make the choice of buying local as convenient as possible while supporting regional farmers and businesses in our local food culture,” says Janelle Tatum, CEO at Mother Earth Foods. “French Broad Food Co-Op has already been doing this for nearly 45 years, and we are excited to pair our missions.”

Tatum also says they’re hoping the convenience of shopping for French Broad Food Co-Op groceries online will encourage shoppers who might otherwise be deterred by traffic congestion and limited parking to buy local food.

Mother Earth Food’s delivery process is simple and efficient. Customers sign up for the service at motherearthfood.com and order weekly customizable produce bins and groceries by noon every Tuesday. Mother Earth Food does the rest – picking up local foods and products from as close to home as possible and delivering them on customer’s scheduled delivery day.

For more information and to sign up for the service, visit motherearthfood.com or call 828-275-3500.

It’s Hawthorn Time

Co-op Stronger Together

It's Hawthorn Time!

As the fall rolls in…a friend and I went out to harvest hawthorn berries. Hawthorn is one of my most beloved herbs. A wonderful heart tonic, it is both soothing and delicious. Here is a couple of recipes to inspire your herbal explorations this fall.
 

Hawthorn Rose Conserve

 
This is a recipe I have made for years, it is so very addictively delicious! This recipe is from Healing Tonics by Jeanine Pollak (a book I highly recommend) :
1/2 cup hawthorn berries (fresh if possible)
1 cup dried rose hips (cut and sifted)
3/4 cup honey
2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
1+ Tbsp. vanilla extract
1 tsp. cinnamon powder
Add hawthorn berries to 2 cups boiling water and simmer over medium low heat for 1 hour. Stir often. Once decocted, let sit for another 30 minutes to 1 hour. Strain and while still hot, pour over the rosehips and let sit for half hour or so. Place 1/2 of the hawthorn rose into a blender and add honey, lemon juice, vanilla and cinnamon. Add more hawthorn rose as needed to get the right consistency….it should be like a thick pudding or jam. Store in the refrigerator and this should last a couple of weeks.
*Notes- Eat daily for best results, this is not only great for the heart, but high in vitamin c and helpful during the cold and flu season.
If you want to amp up the heart love in this formula, you could add tinctures of hawthorn, linden, motherwort, etc.
Enjoy!

Co-op FAQs and Facts

Co-op Stronger Together

What is a Co-op?

 

How can I distinguish a co-op from other organizations?

A co-op is a business, usually incorporated, that sells goods and services. It is not a charitable organization or a social service agency.

Who benefits from the co-op’s existence?

A co-op exists primarily for the benefit of its members. Many co-ops also support other parts of the community through various programs and philanthropic activities as part of their commitment to cooperative values and principles.

Who controls a co-op?

In a cooperative, members democratically control the direction of the business. In most co-ops each member gets one vote. Members elect a board of directors to monitor the business, set goals and hire management to operate their business. Ultimately, the board is accountable to the members for its decisions.

What motivates people to form a co-op?

In private or stockholder-owned businesses, individuals invest to earn a financial return. In a co-op, individuals are motivated by a shared need for certain products or services. By joining together, members gain access to products, services or markets not otherwise available to them. In other words, when forming a co-op members are motivated to become co-owners of the business primarily so that their mutual needs can be met. And co-ops return financial gains to their members, whether through discounts, lower costs or patronage refunds. People join existing co-ops for a variety of reasons. Whether it is the commitment to community, the democratic approach to business, the desire to be part of a business that is locally owned or something else “uniquely co-op” that appeals, anyone can join a cooperative!

Read more on Co-op Stronger Together: https://www.strongertogether.coop/food-coops/co-op-faqs-and-facts

Common Myths About Food Co-ops

Co-op Stronger Together

Common Myths About Food Co-ops

For food lovers on the hunt for fresh local produce and healthy, sustainable products, the local food co-op may be a hidden gem. Why hidden, you ask? Many people, including co-op shoppers, are not entirely sure how co-ops work—or how to get involved. Luckily, the most common misconceptions can be cleared up in a snap. Read on to get the real answers to frequently asked questions about food co-ops. You may be surprised by what you find!

Myth #1

I have to be a member to shop at the food co-op.

Fact
Everyone is welcome to shop at nearly all co-ops. Just do your shopping like you would anywhere else. Once you’ve discovered the benefits of co-op shopping, you might want to find out more about the benefits of membership, too.

Myth #2

I have to be a hippie/liberal/vegetarian/etc. to shop at the co-op.

Fact
Same answer: everyone’s welcome. Liberal or conservative, hippie or yuppie, veggie lover or bacon lover—anyone can shop co-op (that means you!).

Myth #3

Being a co-op member means I have to join the board (or work part-time at the co-op, or do something else I’m not really sure I want to do).

Fact
All you really have to do is enjoy shopping at the co-op! Sure, you can run for the board or participate in co-op events if you like, but your level of participation is always entirely up to you.

Read more myths about food co-ops on Co-op Stronger Together at https://www.strongertogether.coop/food-coops/common-myths-about-food-co-ops 

Tell The World You Own It!

Co-op Stronger Together

Tell the World You Own It

 

You may be surprised by all the types of co-ops around you. From groceries to health care, co-ops are a vital part of everyday life for people all over the globe. Consider the cup of coffee you enjoyed at breakfast. It was likely purchased from a coffee grower co-op in Africa or Central America. Or the light fixture you’re standing under might be powered with electricity from a co-op owned by people in your community.

A co-op is a business model that allows a group of people to combine their resources to meet their common needs. Grocery co-ops are one such kind of co-op. They are the true pioneers of the natural and organic food industry and they’re deeply committed to providing delicious, high quality, healthy food; supporting local, sustainable agriculture; and strengthening their communities. Cooperatives, including grocery co-ops, are much more than bricks and mortar stores. Cooperatives are built on the idea that local owners, not far-away investors, gain the benefits of business success. Simply put, cooperation is for everyone.

Read more on Co-op Stronger Together:  https://www.strongertogether.coop/food-coops/tell-the-world-you-own-it